CALLIDE A POWER STATION

A WORLD-FIRST DEMONSTRATION

The Callide A Power Station in central Queensland, Australia, was retrofitted with oxyfuel and carbon capture technology to demonstrate that, by applying new processes to old technology, we can generate electricity from coal with lower emissions.

Callide A Unit No. 4 was chosen to demonstrate this technology. Callide A was chosen to demonstrate this technology for a number of reasons: the 30 megawatt capacity of the power station's Unit No. 4; the availability of spares from the other three Callide A units; and the availability of operations and maintenance support from CS Energy's nearby Callide B and Callide C power stations..

In 2008, construction started to retrofit oxyfuel technology to the Unit 4 boiler, and install a downstream carbon capture plant.

Between June 2012 and March 2015, this unique and integrated facility ran within the Australian electricity market under normal power station operating conditions.

Today, the Callide Oxyfuel Project leaves a legacy that paves the way for commercial application of oxyfuel carbon capture technology.

Where Is Callide

Callide 'A' Power Station

Commissioned 1965:
Recommissioned 1998

Capacity 120: megawatts

Units 4 x 30: megawatts

Transmission voltage: 132 kV

Fuel: Black coal

Boiler Height: 30 metres

Furnace temperature: 1200 °C

Chimney Height: 76 metres

Exhaust gas temperature: 44 °C
 

THE CALLIDE OXYFUEL PROJECT IS PROOF THAT WE DON’T HAVE TO DISMANTLE THE PAST TO CREATE A CLEANER FUTURE.

The year the Callide ‘A’ Power Station was commissioned.
Located near Biloela in central Queensland, Australia, the Callide Power Station actually comprises 3 stations – Callide ‘A’, Callide ‘B’ and the Callide Power Plant, (Callide ‘C’).

Callide is coal-fired with eight steam turbines with a combined generation capacity
of 1,720 MW of electricity. (Enough to provide power to about 2 million homes). Callide ‘A’, with four 30MW turbines, was refurbished in 1998. It was put in “storage” in 2001 in readiness for its conversion to Oxyfuel technology.